Monday, October 14, 2019

The Development of the Character of Emotion


(A Transcript of the Video)


From childhood, children become aware and responsive to the emotional dyslexia of others, especially those close to them.


For a child to understand this, it is a requirement the child gains the knowledge of why they are the way they are. 



This enables a positive growth towards adolescence and adulthood. If we are all given this knowledge of why, we can begin to be who we want to be.



This video “The Development of the Character of Emotion,” takes you on a journey within the life of Jake.



Jake is representative of many children growing up in our society who are affected by the emotional fragmentation of others.



Unfortunately, this has become quite prevalent in society today.





Many children struggle with life while following this pattern and try to navigate a structure of understanding, believing this is the reality of their life. 



But this reality is defective and has no benefit towards harmonious growth.






Life is meant to be peaceful and content. This is achievable if we understand how our emotions are conceived. We can then personally change from this understanding, enter another reality, and reach the life that is more favourable. 

Favourable for children to grow into balanced adults and adults to take responsibility for their own emotional dyslexia.



I hope this video evokes an understanding for change in your life.






The main role of Jake’s parents was to see their child grow within the confines of what our society offers, and an attempt for Jake to be happy with this development. They believed this will provide Jake with the necessary ingredients to be confident and successful in our society.


Unfortunately, this is not true in many cases, as in many cases the parent is directing a false emotional and negative reality towards the child, 





as they know no alternative and are in emotional conflict with themselves and the society they live in.




With this fractured belief they fictitiously believe their guidance is right for their child.




With no understanding of their misplaced guidance, they possess no understanding of the emotional conflict impacted towards Jake throughout his development.




When Jake externally responds to this, they have no idea why, as they have no understanding of their own emotional conflict within.




Jake initially develops as a child in uterus. He is taught about emotions while in uterus, via the emotional responses of his mother and father, who are responding to life via their emotions.



Emotions are powerful and circulate through our bodies as molecules - a chemical compound that takes part within a chemical reaction – resulting in emotional responses to life. 



Unless we know about how these emotions are formulated, we grow with these emotions believing they are our reality. And with this they rule lives in many ways. And have a deterministic negative influence on ourselves, creating a pseudo personality.




They mainly develop via our primitive emotional brain. The lower portion. And are mainly born out of reactionary forces related to the outside world. Related to a primitive instinct towards survival. 



The upper portion of our brain, the intelligent part, becomes deactivated. These emotions are counter-productive to growth of intelligence, as our sense of self disappears and primitive emotional survival takes over. 



And ultimately affects the growth of child in uterus in a negative way.







Jake is growing in uterus and begins to recognize the outside world is not quite calm and not quite mentally safe.




To commence Jake’s life his parents had pleasurable sex through an emotional response related to a primitive brain function. In other words, they were irresponsible and selfish, and showed no foresight, consideration, responsibility or intelligence towards the child’s future. 



Their intelligent brain was overridden by a primitive emotion. Sex occurs and a child is conceived. There is no intelligence associated with this, only primitive desire. It is stimulated from a part of the brain associated with a primitive instinct. In reality Jake’s parents only thought of themselves.




During Jake’s 9 months in uterus he listens to his mother’s emotional anxiety and stress, that is associated with living in our economic society: 



Casual work, lack of money, alcohol, medication, insecurity. The list goes on.





Jake is already feeling what life is like out there and recognizes this emotional turmoil. So much so it becomes a blueprint for his future Being.





Jake is born and realistically experiences his mother’s emotional turmoil with life. The reality is confronting for him. 




All he wants is to be loved and nurtured in a connective peaceful environment. This is far from the truth.




His father enters his life on occasions. Himself emotionally damaged by life. Jake grows with this fragmentation and it becomes part of Jake's blueprint of inner Self. He is becoming emotionally programmed with the emotion from others.




Jake eventually enters the school system. 




He meets a friend with parents who are also emotional dysfunctional in life. Their emotions also ruling their lives because they do not know any other way of coping, or any other alternative. Except to be emotionally reactive. 


Jake is now recognising this appears to be life and tries to settle into this fragmented existence, believing it is the only reality.



During the next 11 years Jake is taught by the school system that the only way in life is a good education, 





because education will give him a job, and a future.



A future to buy what he wants. And all this will make him happy. And he follows this directive as no other alternative has been offered to him.

And when he reaches 16 years of age, he realizes it is all a lie!






Jake does not find it easy to get a job, and most jobs are casual. Jake and his friend find that life is insecure and not quite what they had been taught. 



He is unable to buy the things he wants, and cannot grow in our economic society life as was taught to him.


Jake is now in emotional turmoil. This is the only way he has been taught and experienced life. To deal with life through his emotion. He is suffering. He sees no alternative as no alternative has been offered to him.



Jake is sent to a therapist but the therapist is taught to help Jake fit in with the society he doesn’t relate to. His emotional turmoil is so great he contemplates suicide.



To find relief from his trauma he consumes himself in risky behaviour. Alcohol, drugs, sex and more. He disappears in the world of TV and entertainment. He is desperately looking for relief and answers. He can’t find any.



He reaches the brick wall of despair. He can’t move. He is stagnating in a reality that is suppressing his psyche with no alternatives. He hasn’t been taught that behind the brick wall there is another reality.





If only Jake was told his parents succumbed to a primitive brain function that results in no thought for his future, only selfish pleasure.




If only his parents knew that while Jake was in uterus, he was listening to all their emotional conflicts that resulted in a negative influence on Jake’s psyche and eventual growth of negative emotions.


If only Jake was told there is a part of his brain that can override and regulate emotions. 



Enabling him to think coherently with focus and control. 




Providing an intelligence and giving his life purpose. 
But Jake wasn’t told this.






If only Jake’s parents knew their emotional dependence on alcohol, drugs, reactions, and associative negative personal abnormalities were having a negative influence on Jake, 

and unknown they were producing a child associated with life’s negativity.  But Jake’s parents did not know this.


If only Jake was told the school system has its limits.  And depending on societies economic structure, Jake may have difficulty finding a job when he reaches adolescence. Jake wasn’t told this. If he was told this reality his choices would be more realistic. 


If he was taught that life's happiness is not about what he acquires, or external wants and needs, he would have had a more balanced approach to life. Jake wasn't told this.




This resulted in Jake and his friend slipping into a depressed state.






So, Jake reached adolescence and found confusion and disillusionment. A whirlpool of emotional misfunctioning….and he got angry, because he did not know any other way.



It is no wonder he entered the world of escapism to find some relief from his turmoil.




It is no wonder he reached the brick wall. Because no alternative was explained to him, even though the alternative is just behind the brick wall.



If only Jake had been given all this knowledge in life, he could have created another person and be free of the emotional dyslexia forced onto him. He could have grown up to be another person. He would have had the opportunity to find Personal Peace. 

      He didn't have this opportunity.




Jake was now at the brick wall and he has to make a choice.





He either gives in to his emotional turmoil or give in to the society he knows no alternative. He makes a choice - the only choice he had been taught.



Jake chose society life. Even though he felt incomplete. Even though he felt there was something missing. Even though it troubled him.



Jake went through life feeling an emotional loss. A sense of something missing. And he didn’t know why.



At 80 years of age Jake lies in a hospital bed. A nurse is holding his hand. He is dying. He moves his head to the right and looks up at the nurse and says: “What is life all about nurse?” She ponders for a moment and says: 

"It's quite simple Jake. We need to teach our children there is more than what we see in society and more than what society offers. If we do that, we can find our purpose in life, because it's all about knowing what's inside and not what we see outside."



He looks up at her for a moment, moves his head, looks up at the ceiling, closes his eyes….and dies.



“To know ourselves is to be free of emotional disturbances and allow ourselves to see life as an inner meaning rather than external superficiality.”




(c) Mitchell Zen